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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Harry Reid
U.S. Senator,( D-Nevada), Majority Leader
CSPAN2 12/09/2014
Reid: And the implications of this report are profound. Not only is torture wrong but it doesn't work. And for people, we hear them coming from different places, saying it was great, it was terrific what we did, it got us so much. it got us nothing except a bad name. Without this report, the American people would not know what actually took place under the C.I.A.'s torture program. This critical report highlights the importance of senate oversight and the role that congress must play in overseeing the executive branch of government. The only way our country can put this episode in the past is to come to terms with what happened and commit to ensuring it will never happen again. This is how we as Americans make our nation stronger. When we realize there is a problem, we seek the evidence. We study it, we learn from it, and then we set about to enact change.
Harry Reid
U.S. Senator,( D-Nevada), Senate Minority Leader
KQED 05/22/2015
Woodruff: Many democrats, including Minority Leader Harry Reid, are also dug in against keeping The Patriot Act alive. Reid: There's efforts made to extend a program that's already been declared by the second circuit court of appeals of the united states, already declared is illegal. How can we extend an illegal act? But that's what some of the talk is from the other side of the aisle. Woodruff: This afternoon republican Richard Burr of North Carolina, chairing the intelligence committee, offered yet another option: Extend the Patriot Act, but end bulk data collection after two years. In the meantime, the Justice Department has announced the N.S.A. will have to start in winding down phone surveillance this weekend, to meet the June 1 deadline.
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